August 31, 2014

art-and-fury:

Memento Mori - Jean Labourdette (Turf One)

(via carboncradle)

August 27, 2014

(Source: kansassire, via pimpbright)

August 27, 2014

(Source: last-picture-show, via awelltraveledwoman)

August 25, 2014
bedelgeuse:

"beauty is in the brains" anatomical collage art by bedelgeuse

bedelgeuse:

"beauty is in the brains" anatomical collage art by bedelgeuse

August 24, 2014
malformalady:

Heart of a 26-year-old man, perforated by a bullet, New York, 1937. New York City Medical Examiner’s Collection, National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

malformalady:

Heart of a 26-year-old man, perforated by a bullet, New York, 1937. New York City Medical Examiner’s Collection, National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

(via pimpbright)

August 24, 2014

boyirl:

Orange & March (flora portrait) // Hsiao Ron Cheng

(via poke-bank)

August 13, 2014

nevver:

Chimera, William Farges

(Source: behance.net, via businessbot)

August 9, 2014

cross-connect:

The Wonderful Paintings of Christina Mrozic

Christina Mrozik has spent the majority of her life observing the natural world and the types of relationships that form within it. Having grown up on the Grand River in Michigan, she was inspired by it’s habitats at an early age. Blending the external world with her own understanding of the human condition has led to her distinct style, in which flora and fauna stand in, representing the simultaneous and often opposing matters of the human heart. She often draws with ink and marker on paper, adding bursts of color with watercolor and high pigmented acrylics. Christina is inspired by many of the early naturalists such as Audobon, but also by visual storytellers such as Rackham. She views the art making process as one of portraiture, in which analyzing the drawing helps make sense of peoples’ histories and abilities. Currently based in Grand Rapids Michigan, she has shown both regionally and nationally. Currently she is working on designs for Twinne in London, branding projects for Nice Collective and recently returned from Cabin Time: A Roaming Artist Residency in the Porcupine Mountains. She is making work every day in her studio in preparation for upcoming shows, and is excited to see what’s next.

(via poke-bank)

August 7, 2014
"Where beautiful women in 1950s culture got married or seduced, in modern culture beauty gets raped. Even if we never seek out pornography, we often see rape where sex should be. Since most women repress our awareness of that in order to survive being entertained, it can take concentration to remember. According to a Screen Actors Guild study in 1989 - a year in which female leading roles made up only 14 percent of the total - a growing number of the roles for women cast them as rape victims or prostitutes. In France, TV viewers see fifteen rapes a week. That has a different effect on the audience than, for example, seeing murders: One person in four is unlikely to be murdered. But even if she avoids pornography, a woman will, by watching mainstream, middle-brow plays, films and TV, learn the conventions of her threatened rape in detail, close up.
Rape fantasies projected into the culture are benign, we’re told, even beneficial, when commentators dismiss them through what Catharine MacKinnon has satirized as “the hydraulic model” of male sexuality (it lets off steam). Men, we are given to understand, are harmlessly interested in such fantasies; women are harmlessly interested in them (though many women may have [interest] for no more subtle psychological reason than that that image of sexuality is the primary one they witness). But what is happening now is that men and women whose private psycho-sexual history would not lead them to eroticize sexual violence are learning from such scenes to be interested in it. In other words, our culture is depicting sex as rape so that men and women will be interested in it."

Naomi Wolf - The Beauty Myth

August 1, 2014

theonlymagicleftisart:

Polaroid photographer Kathy Rankin

We asked the talented Polaroid photographer Kathy Rankin to tell us a little bit about herself and her photography.


Kathy Rankin: I’m an instant photographer and teacher currently living in Seoul, Korea. I began shooting Polaroid about 6 or 7 years ago.
To me, there’s something extraordinary about shooting instant film. The colors, the softness, the blur, the unpredictability of it all, the fact that you can hold something tangible in your hands~ these are just some of the qualities that make shooting film this type of film so addictive.

I’ve always been interested in the human condition~fear, anxiety, isolation, the unknown as well as dreams, and I use self-portraiture as a means to explore these issues. Recently, I was asked to participate in a project called ‘The 12.12 Project along with 11 other amazing instant photographers. It’s a year-long-project where each photographer picks a theme, and this theme is interpreted by each of the 12 artists. The project starts in September. 

Flickr

Our Quarterly boxes are now $50 $30. The next box will include a hardcover photobook of Brandon C. Long's Polaroid photography and one lucky subscriber will receive a Polaroid camera and a pack of Impossible film: quarterly.co/art 

(via how-fascinating)

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